DIY Canvas Barnwood Frame

For this week's project, my good friend Dustin and I built a custom barn wood frame for a canvas photo for his clinic. This is a very fun project, is easy to make, and can be done in a day! All thats needed for this project is some reclaimed barn wood (or wood of choice), wood glue, a miter or circular saw, and nailgun or hammer and nails. Check out the video tutorial, step-by-step post, downloadable plans, and custom canvas printing from Pictorem. The photo for the canvas was taken by Brandon Ostermiller of Bozeman, Montana. I'd highly recommend his services.

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Tools Needed

Miter Saw​– I’d recommend a 12 inch sliding, miter saw.
Table Saw – I recommend Rigid or Ryobi saws.
Drill​– I use R​yobi drills.​
Nail Gun (you could use hammer and nails instead)
Tape Measure, Ruler, Pencil

Optional:

Orbital Sander​– Ryobi makes a nice one.
Clamps​– Clamps are helpful for any project. I love to use JackClamps
Speed Square

Supplies Needed

Canvas Print from Pictorem – Click here to purchase yours, their prices and services are amazing
Barnwood
Wood Glue – I recommend Gorilla Glue
Sandpaper, Screws, Nails

Clean the Barnwood and Cut to Size

We'll start this project by making sure the barnwood is completely free of any nails, screws, dirt, and debris. You can either use some sandpaper to clean it off, a hand-held brush, or scraper. Be sure not to sand too much (just get any surface dirt, etc off). We want to leave the wood distressed and aged, it adds to the look. Then with your table saw or circular saw, measure and mark out your cuts. Refer to the downloadable plans for a complete cut list.

barnwood, barnwood frame, canvas frame, miter frame, barn wood

Cut the Lengths and Angles on the Miter Saw

Once we have all of the boards ripped down to the right thickness and width, we'll head over to the miter saw to make the length and angle cuts. You may want to make the cuts generous (not exact dimensions at first) to ensure you've left enough for the 45 degree mitered corners. Measure twice and cut once! All of the corners are mitered together, so cut them all to 45 degree angles that will come together to form 90 degree corners. For the lengths, refer to the downloadable plans here or measure your custom canvas print's length.

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Assemble the Main Frame

Start with one corner, true it up, glue it up, and screw it together. You want to make sure to add wood glue to these miter joints, pre drill any spots where screws are going to go, and use clamps if need be. After you've built one miter corner, bring it to the canvas frame and attach it using screws (pre-drill these holes too). Directly drill from the canvas interior frame into your barnwood frame. Repeat these steps for each of the four mitered corners.

barnwood, barnwood frame, canvas frame, miter frame, barn wood

barnwood, barnwood frame, canvas frame, miter frame, barn wood

Attach the Outer Frame

Now we add the outer section of the frame that adds depth and dimension to the overall look. If, when ripping your barnwood boards, you exposed sections of wood that don't match the barnwood look, then either wood burn them, use a steel wool and vinegar solution, or other aging method now. Apply wood glue to the lengths of every section that will be taking these outer frame pieces. Align it all and use your nailgun or hammer and nails to attach to the main frame.

barnwood, barnwood frame, canvas frame, miter frame, barn wood

barnwood, barnwood frame, canvas frame, miter frame, barn wood

Install and Enjoy

Almost done, we just need to install it! You'll want to screw this canvas photo with barnwood frame directly into studs (the size and weight of ours needed direct stud install). Screw it into place and step back and admire! This is a great project that doesn't take long and is fun to collaborate on. Post your barnwood frame pieces below!

Be sure to check out the downloadable plans here and order your canvas print from Pictorem here. Cheers!