DIY Concrete Dining Table

How to make a Concrete Dining Table! This is an excellent DIY concrete project for beginners and the more experienced alike! This clean, modern, minimalist design approach will look great in your dining room. This project doesn’t take that long to make and is attainable by anyone if you follow this step-by-step tutorial. Best of luck on yours! This particular 1 1/2″ concrete top weighs about 370 pounds total. Be sure to watch the video below, download the free plans, and share this with your friends. 

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Tools Needed

Miter Saw​– I’d recommend a 12 inch sliding, miter saw
Table Saw OR Circular Saw
Drill
Impact Driver
Orbital Sander​– Ryobi makes a nice one.
Concrete Trowel
Respirator mask
Tape Measure, Ruler, Pencil
Eye, Ear, and Hand protection

Supplies Needed

Quikrete Countertop Mix or Quikrete 5000 (less expensive option)
Cheng Concrete Sealer
100% Silicone
4 – L Brackets/Joists
Gorilla Wood Glue
Minwax Polyurethane
Minwax Espresso Stain
Melamine sheet
Lumber for the base – see wood / cut list in free plans
Sandpaper

Approximate Total Cost: $195

The Concrete Dining Table can be made for under $195 dollars in materials cost. This is the cost for the concrete, wood, wood finish, concrete sealer, and other basic supplies. This estimate considers you’re using Quikrete 5000 as a more affordable option. *Note: This doesn’t include smaller things you may already have around the shop, including: screws, glue, sandpaper, etc. I bought my chairs at World Market, and you can find similar chairs on their website by clicking here.

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Cut the Melamine Pieces

We’ll start this project by marking and making cuts for the melamine form. Refer to the cut list in the free plans for the dimensions. You’ll end up using most of a full 4’x8’ sheet of melamine for the concrete form. I’d recommend cutting the melamine with a circular saw or table saw. Once all of your cuts are made, we’ll assemble the melamine form.

Assemble Melamine Form

You should set that large, bottom piece of the melamine form on a flat, level work surface. With melamine forms, you’ll want to be sure to keep it very clean and make sure there are no imperfections or chipping in any of the boards. Whatever faces the inside of the form will translate onto the concrete top after it’s poured. 

We’ll assemble the sides with 1 ½ wood screws. Be sure to pre drill all holes before adding the screws and make sure everything is square, level, and flush when you’re screwing it together. Don’t add wood glue to the sides of the melamine form, because we’ll need to easily deconstruct it later.

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Finish the Form, Mix Concrete, Cut Reinforcement

Once your melamine form is all screwed together, we’ll want to seal the edges of the inside of the form. The best, easiest way to do so is by adding a clean bead of 100% silicone to the edges. Follow through with a beveled edge tool and make sure there is not an excess of silicone on the mold. I used Quikrete’s Countertop Mix, myself, yet have used Quikrete 5000 before and this project would look great with it. Quikrete 5000 is a much more affordable option. Then combine your water and concrete mixes in a large tub and stir it up! Refer to the video for more helpful tips on mixing concrete.

 

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concrete, concrete dining table, dining table, table, concrete table, concrete project, DIY concrete, DIY concrete table, DIY

We’ll then need to cut a piece of rebar reinforcement that’ll add into the form and help strengthen the concrete top even more. The easiest way to cut these is simply with wire/bolt cutters. Make the reinforcement 1”-2” less than the size of the full form and concrete top. 

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Pour Concrete into Form

After mixing up the tubs concrete and getting it to a consistency that is peanut-butter-like, then we’ll add it to the form. Wear gloves for this process, spread the concrete evenly in the form and fill it about ⅔ full. Once you’ve reached ⅔ and have spread all of the concrete out evenly, we’ll add the piece of rebar reinforcement to the form. Place it into place and keep adding more concrete to fill it to the top of the form.

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Screed, Trowel, and Let Cure

Once you’ve filled the form with your concrete mixture, we’ll want to level and smooth it all out. Using a scrap 2×4 piece of wood will work fine for the level and screeding of the concrete. Scrape the board from one side of the form to the other in a back-and-forth motion, scraping excess concrete out of the form and working it into low spots. Then we can vibrate the concrete either with a mallet, reciprocating saw (without the blade in), or orbital sander. Spend some time vibrating the concrete. Then trowel it all with a clean trowel and cover the whole concrete top with a plastic cover to help it cure evenly. Let the concrete cure and dry for the manufacturers recommended time. Once it has hardened slightly, you can come through and do a hard trowel of the bottom. Refer to the video for more information about this technique. 

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Build the Base 

Plans are currently being updated in increase the strength of the base with diagonal cross supports. If you are planning on building this table, please do your research to determine the best layout to make your table structurally sound.

 

Take the Concrete out of Mold

We make it a point to do the concrete portion of this project first, because the curing and setting of the concrete takes some time. Refer to the manufacturers recommend timeframe and remove the concrete top from the mold when it’s ready. Be sure to ask a few friends for a hand in this, as the top is very heavy and the moving of it shouldn’t be attempted by just one person. Carefully deconstruct the melamine mold and take it off of the concrete. After the sides are off, flip it all over and take the main top piece off. The concrete will still be curing and needs more time after this mold is taken off. Let it do it’s thing.

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Finish the Concrete

Now we’ll sand, spot fill, and seal the concrete dining table’s top. Take the time that this step requires, paying special attention to sanding and filling in any voids. I personally like the organic look of concrete and it’s all up to you how much filling you want to do. Sand the entire top down with a 100 grit sandpaper, again flipping the top over (with help) and being sure to sand down everything. Then move on to a 220 grit sandpaper, etc. Spend time easing the edges of the concrete top, the corners, the underside edges and any spots where hands, arms, and anyone might touch.

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The Portland cement slurry mixture that I use to fill voids in concrete tops is an easy mixture to make, it’s simply one part water to one part Portland cement. If desired, make this mixture and fill in any spots that you may see. Let this dry and cure before sanding it down again. Then we’ll add our sealer! I used a 100% food safe, high quality sealer made by Cheng Concrete for this. Grab your desired sealer, dilute it down with water and apply nice, smooth, even coats making the water to sealer mixture stronger (less diluted) as you go. You can apply as many coats as you’d like, I did about four coats with the final coat being nearly 100% sealer. Let this cure and dry for the manufacturers recommended time.

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Assemble, Install, and Enjoy!

For mounting the concrete tabletop to a wood base, I used a method of installing wooden blocks on the bottom side of the concrete that help support it. Use construction adhesive or a quick epoxy to secure the wooden blocks in place and then mount them tight to the inside edges of the wood frame’s top.

Thank you for checking out this tutorial, comment below with your finished concrete dining table, any questions you may, or just to say hello. Refer to the free project plans for the wood cut list, project blueprints, and more. Cheers from Montana!

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  • daniel taraborelli

    Hi Pete,
    Thank you for the plans,
    unfortunately I was not able to use your measurements do to my chairs being to wide,
    I had to use 55 inch board for the length of the table. do you know the measurement I would have to use for the middle part the extra support? (triangle). And also I wanted to know if there is a way to make the table lighter? I Heard of maybe using foam in the core ?
    look forward to hearing from you.
    regards,
    Daniel Taraborelli

    • Hi Daniel! What triangle are you referring to? — So your total table will be 55 inches long correct? As for making the table lighter — I don’t recommend going thinner then 1 1/2 inches on a project this size. Sometimes I will do an apron around the perimeter to make it look 2 or 3 inches thick and use foam inside so the majority is only 1 1/2 inches thick. (here is a foam example on my site – http://www.diypete.com/how-to-make-a-concrete-coffee-table/ ) Let me know if it helps. Cheers!

  • VIRGINIE LUDMER

    Hi Pete, I just finished my concrete table top and everything was good until I applied my last coat of Cheng sealer, which left traces… I don’t know what to do. Do you suggest I sand my table top again? Or shall I try to apply another coat of sealer? Thanks for your advice. Virginie

    • DIYPETE

      Hi Virginie! Sorry for the delay. It’s hard to say without a photo, but most likely I’d add another coat. Cheers

  • Dani Feliciano

    I love all your diy videos and tutorials. My husband and I are buying some property and farmhouse/country decor is what we want. I would like to do a mixture of the farmhouse table you built for your home from Ana’s sight with a concrete top, but instead of the full concrete top I was thinking of doing concrete squares separated by wood for the table top. Would you have any suggestions for me? Sealing process, etc.? Thank you so much! 🙂

    • DIYPETE

      Hey Dani!

      If you are thinking primary a wood top — with smaller concrete squares — I’d most likely use a wood sealer on the wood — and a concrete sealer for the concrete. I’d probably create a lip to hold the concrete in place and level with the surface — I’m not sure I understand exactly what you are thinking, but can’t wait to see what you come up with!!

  • Jérémie Ouellet

    Hi Pete, Great project.
    I’m doing a dining table with 2 X 5/8 plywood covered with 1/4 to 1/2 of stone mason http://ca.henry.com/concrete-and-flooring-accessories/floor-patching-levelers/stone-mason-floor-patch-and-leveler-cement
    Do you think it’s a good idea? any tips or hint for glue or additive in the concrete?

    For the sealer, i have some Sika® Florseal WB 18 http://can.sika.com/en/solutions-and-products/document-download/Sika_Florseal_PDS_Alpha1.html
    Do you recommend this sealer? do you think it will be ok?

    I want natural finnish and color of the concrete. I did a test and it seems to hold on pretty good.

    Thanks for your time.

  • Sjschwar

    Are there any disadvantages to using the cement all? Is it not concrete?
    Does it still need to be covered when drying?

    • DIYPETE

      I would recommend against using cement all. I used to use it for some smaller projects but haven’t been that happy with it. Cement all dries very quick which is awesome – but I have had cracking issues in some tests and larger scale projects. I’d recommend a quikrete 5000 or countertop mix for a project like the dining table.

  • Catherine

    Do you think the same base and attachment could be done with a slab of marble? I love white marble and have always wanted a dining table but pre-made ones are astronomical. I have talked to some kitchen counter companies and you can buy a slab for a table. I figure support for a concrete slab would work for a marble slab?

    • DIYPETE

      Hi! Yes, a similar base would work for marble or granite.

  • Tyler Jordan

    I’m in the middle of building the base from your plans and it seems the diagonals are 2″ short. They are 31″ long point to long point but still come up short. I’ve triple checked the rest of the measurements. Also, I’m unable to figure out how (5) 4″x4″x8′ allow for enough wood for the whole thing. I had to go buy another one. I’m not mad or anything, I just want to know where I went wrong or if the plans are incorrect.

  • Kari

    Hi, Can this table be used outdoor as well

    • DIYPETE

      Hi Kari! Concrete is great for outdoor spaces. For the wood, you’ll want to make sure it has a good outdoor deck stain to protect it.

  • Jacob Wollenberg

    Hi Pete. You have really inspired me to start my own project. My wife found the base of an old table, which needed some work. For this I wanted the top made of concrete, and used your idea with the dining table, but in a smaller size.
    Now, as the concrete has hardened, I have a really nice ecliptic area in the middle, which is lighter than the surroundings. What am I doing wrong??? :-O

    • DIYPETE

      Hey Jacob! So glad you’ve been inspired to try out a concrete project. Did the lighter area even out after continuing to dry and sand? Is it a whitish color or just lighter? Did you add color to the mix?

      • Jacob Wollenberg

        Hi Pete, Thanks for for reply. As I sanded the surface down, the lighter area evened out. I guess, it was caused by difference in vibrating the concrete. I put the mold on a table, at which, I was only able to vibrate the middle. I am now building a “vibrating” platform for the “re-run” of my table. I abandoned the project due to too many air bubbles. I have place 20 tennis balls between my work bench and the platform, so the vibration isn’t absorbed by my solid workbench. Hope this will do the trick.
        How far should the reinforcement be from the surface of the top, before it doesn’t show? My reinforcement “shines” through. Another reason for abandoning and starting over.

        PS. I really enjoy your page, especially the hyperlinks, so the non-english born (I live in Denmark), can see what you use.

        • DIYPETE

          Hi Jacob,

          Glad to hear you are experimenting and learning about concrete projects. Fill the mold a little more then halfway and then vibrate the concrete. I like to let the concrete sit just a bit so it firms up ever so slightly and then I’ll add the re-enforcement. This way excessive vibrating won’t allow the re-enforcement to sink and get closer to the top of the finished table top. I’ll then fill up the rest of the mold — making sure to blend the second batch by pushing with my fingers and allowing it to completely blend around all the sides, as well as with the ever so slightly firmed up first pour. Then do a screed and final vibrate. Let me know if this helps. Cheers

  • Shanthi Bala

    Hi Pete
    This is my first attempt on a concrete project. Thanks to your blog and videos, I was able to create my own concrete dining table. Pic enclosed.

    • DIYPETE

      That turned out beautiful Shanthi! Wow!! Thank you for sharing the photo 🙂 I’d love to share it on the Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/diyprojectswithpete if you are on Facebook and would like to share it to the page. Take care!

      • Shanthi

        Thanks Pete. I posted the pics on your FB page.

        • DIYPETE

          Perfect, thanks!

      • alecia

        I loved the legs you used for the table. May I ask where you bought them?

  • Brian Murphy

    I’m on the final finishing stages for my dining table build. I have some sanding to finish up, and then I need to seal it. I am looking to order the Cheng sealer you referenced. I had a couple quick questions.

    You mention diluting it in the write up. How much are you diluting it in the different steps of sealing? What are the rations for sealing pass 1-4?

    Also, I see the sealer is listed as covering 30-40 square feet. I assume that is in a pure, undiluted coat. My surface is approximately 26 square feet. Will I need 4 bottles, or can I get away with less given that I will be diluting it?

    Thanks in advance for your answers!

    • DIYPETE

      Hi Brian! Yes, diluting it is a good idea. I do about 1 part to 4 parts for the first couple coats. Then 1 to 1 for coats 3 to 5. Then 100% on the last. It really does go a long way. You’ll be fine with 1 bottle. I did my dining table and still had quite a bit left.

      • Brian Murphy

        Thanks for the reply Pete. One last question, to clarify…

        One 500ML bottle should be enough for my 26 square foot project? Just making sure you’re not referencing one gallon size bottle.

        Thanks again!

  • Rex

    The new plans have added diagonal pieces for extra support. I really prefer the original version, without the extra supports — was there an issue with stability? I’d be making this a smaller size, 27″ x 60″ for use as a kitchen island.

    • DIYPETE

      Hey Rex, It could be done for sure. I did this as an extra precaution. You might use lag bolts and just make sure everything is super sturdy.

  • Chrisy C. Walsh

    Great tutorial. I am planning on taking my older wood dining table and adding a cement top to it. So the table surface itself is 4ft by 5ft by 2 inches (height/thickness). If I drill the side supports directly into my table (so I’d be drilling into the 2 inch area), pour the concrete in, how do you suggest I ensure the sides covered by the side supports get covered with cement? Should I just go over it with cement paste? Also if I’m putting concrete on top of the table, do I still need the reinforcement?

    • DIYPETE

      Hi Chrisy! I’m not sure I’m 100% picturing what you are going for, but here are a few ideas.

      1. You can use an apron to cover existing wood ( similar to the video – part 1 on doing concrete top) http://www.diypete.com/how-to-make-a-concrete-coffee-table/ — and you’d want re-enforcement. — However, if you are planning to keep the 2 inch wood top, you might look at doing a concrete overlay. (basically a thin layer of polymer based concrete). You trowel it on. Here is an example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGGTxr1pH2I ( you’d want a special overlay mix ) Ardex makes one. Let me know if that helps!

  • Sara

    Hi Pete. My husband and I are going a make concrete top table but we have a big family and need a table that can sit 8. Can you tell us what the measurements should he to accommodate all of us?
    Sara

    • DIYPETE

      Hi Sarah! You’ll definitely need additional support for the base/bracing and the concrete top will be much heavier, but it can done. I’d recommending measuring your chairs and making sure there is a little wiggle room between each. You’d want to do 3 on each side and the one on end I’d guess. Here is a reference point to start at to help determine length. https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=table+length+for+8&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8 Let me know if that helps. Cheers!

  • Rob Rizzo

    Pete – thanks for the plans. Here are some of my phots of my table top. I added a wooden walnut slab in the middle along with some turquoise inlay and used a concrete stain that I applied after the sanding and prior to the sealing. Pls feel free to email with any questions rerizzo@mac.com

    • DIYPETE

      Rob! Absolutely beautiful. How is it holding is the slab the same thickness as the concrete? That glow in the dark epoxy is sweet looking as well!

  • Jeremy Migneault

    Just attacking my creative side now, well now that I’m a home owner. Here are my recents. Going to try your concrete dining table on the weekend! 🙂

    • DIYPETE

      I love these projects Jeremy. Super creative! Keep up the good work. Cheers from Montana – Pete

  • Nancy Rivera Rivera

    Hello Pete I am searching for old comments of this project and cant find them. I asked some questions and you answered previously. I finally initiated this project and in the process of sanding and filling up the potholes. I can only find white portland cement. Is there another way to fill them? If I use the white Portland cement I will need to purchase liquid cement color, charcoal for just a few drops. The investment will be more and won’t need to use all this material. Any other recommendation?

    • DIYPETE

      Hi Nancy! I’m not sure where the comments are, but I’ll answer here 🙂 Portland cement is what I’d recommend. — Or, if you have leftover grey concrete — you could sift the concrete to get the portland cement from the mix separated — and use that —- which would save from having to buy more material and make another trip. The other option would be the white concrete and pigment.

  • ruth

    atezk
    I would like to make an 8 foot by 32 inch concrete top table. Would that size piece of concrete risk cracking?

    • DIYPETE

      Hi Ruth! That size would be doable in a slab that is 1.5 inches thick. Make sure to use re-enforcement. Cheers!

  • ‫محمد أحمد‬‎

    I do not have quikrete countertop mix .. we only have portland cement what should I do

    • I’d recommend 1 part cement, 2 parts gravel, 3 parts sand, and then add water. Additives can be added if you desire.

  • Jess

    My husband and I just finished a project that used a modified version of the legs you proposed in your post- thank you! We did watch a YouTube video that inspired us to fill the inside of the mold with foam insulation (to keep the thick lip on the outside but cut down on overall weight. Here are a few pictures!
    Jess

    • Jess

      Pictures

      • Jess

        Final picture- it took us 5 men, 6 bags of quickrete, and the table is 4′ by 6′.

        • Hi Jess! That looks great 🙂 Congratulations on the build and thanks so much for sharing! The stain combination looks nice too. Enjoy!

      • Dayna Michele

        Hey Jess and Pete, I am having a hard time finding complete plans for the base of the table. I really like the way yours looks jess! I have small children so safety is a big issue with such a heavy table. Is it possible to get the plans for your table base? @@PeteSveen:disqus I saw that you were modifying the base plans to be able to better support the table? Are those ready yet? Thank you!

        • Dayna Michele

          I think I meant to @@diypete:disqus please see above about the base plans- thank you!

          • diypete

            Hi Dayna! A good friend of mine built a table and did this base (Based off Any White’s table) — It is extremely sturdy and they love it. If you want a similar design to mine, the plans can be found here and it is very similar to mine — but with an added support on the base. I’d also recommend using leg bolts to further increase it’s strength (vs just screws). https://gumroad.com/l/concretediningtable

            • Jess

              Dayna, we opted to use the lag bolts that DIYPete recommended above, and the legs are very stable to support the weight of the concrete tabletop. We found them at Home Depot. Be sure to pre-drill the holes! Can’t wait to see pictures ????

      • diypete

        Love it!

    • Jess

      Here are the legs!

    • Clint Fleming

      Hi Jess,
      I have plans to make a concrete table in the near future, and I was also wanting it to have the thicker look. But until now, I wasn’t sure how to do it.

      How thick does the table look ?
      How thick is the center section of the table ?
      Did you use wire mesh for reinforcement ?

      • Jess

        Hi Clint- Happy Easter!

        The table looks about 5″ thick. The middle portion is about 3 1/2″ thick. We accomplished this by using a piece of foam insulation only in the center while pouring the concrete. We also colored the concrete using an additive found at Home Depot (charcoal colored).

        We ended up skipping the Portland cement step, because we pounded the table for hours while the concrete dried, and had very few of the tiny holes as reference in DIY Pete’s video (I can’t remember what the formal name is for the holes). We used the same sealant (food grade water based sealant) the DIY Pete recommended.

        If I were to do the project again, I would look into GFIC (Glass Reinforced Concrete) to reduce the weight of the table. As I referenced, our table is 4’x6′, and used every ounce of muscle from 5 men to move in from the garage to the dining room (only 2 steps up).

        We also purchased Cheng wax sealant and Cheng concrete countertop cleaner, which have been wonderful for ongoing maintenance.

        We had an absolute blast with this project, and we are by no means DIY-ers. Give it a try! Let this community know if you have questions along the way, and I’m sure we’ll help as best we can. I’m posting a couple of measuring pictures for your reference.

        Good luck!

        Jess

        • Jess

          And yes, we used remesh wire in the table to add strength (also from Home Depot).

      • DIYPETE

        Hey Clint! Hope all is well. Looks like Jess did a great job with answers to your questions. Thanks Jess! Second, my latest video will most likely give you a few ideas on reducing weight using some of the methods Jess explained. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9A_DWfbLzs — Have a great week!

        • Clint Fleming

          Hey Pete !
          Yes, I actually just watched that video, and it did help clarify a few things for sure.
          I will be building a dinning room table using this method, and I just had a few other questions:
          Would the pink foam insulation work well for this application ?
          And as for the wire reinforcement, should I just use a flat piece of the wire mesh, or would it be better if I tried to bend up the edge, all the way around, so that I get a bit of wire into the thicker edge ?

          • DIYPETE

            Hey Clint!

            Yep, the pink foam sheets will work perfect. I only used the white foam since it is a bit cheaper. As for getting the wired into the edges — I’ve honestly done a number of projects like this and not had issues. You could certainly add wire into the edge if you’d like though. Or fiber are another option and you could mix them in with the concrete used around the edges. It is cheap and you can order fibers on Amazon if you can’t find them locally at a concrete supply store. Can’t wait to see your project!

            • Clint Fleming

              Ok Great !!
              This info will be very helpful !!!
              I don’t think I’m going to make the base out of wood. I am thinking maybe steel or concrete.
              Have you ever made concrete bases for any of your tables ?
              I was thinking of maybe hollow concrete square pillars, maybe 1.5″ thick.
              Would the concrete be strong enough without any reinforcement wire ?

              • DIYPETE

                Hi Clint! Awesome!

                I have done steel bases — but not concrete yet. As for the concrete pillars — I’d do some kind of re-enforcement. Glass fiber re-enforcement works well for these situations — but you’ll want to do some testing as I’ve never done this exact type of project. I have done pillars — and sometimes getting the foam out of the center can be real tough — so make sure to use a release agent, and to plan on spending some time de-molding. Steel would look super nice with the concrete though and is probably what I’d do ( quicker, super strong, and easy to work with ). Let me know if that helps. Cheers!

                • Clint Fleming

                  Thanks for the info Pete !!!
                  It is much appreciated !
                  I think I will go with Steel. Just have to figure out what style of legs I want.
                  I know that you have said that you can use either Quickcrete 5000 or Quickcrete countertop. Does one of them give you a better finished product than the other ?

                  I am going to put a little in your donate box, t make up for all of your great advise. Thank you !!!
                  Clint

                  • DIYPETE

                    Hey Clint!

                    Saw you donated and wanted to first thank you for that 🙂 So, Quikrete 5000 or the countertop will both work. The counter mix is $22/bag and the 5000 is only $5 / bag. I feel the countertop mix is a little easier to trowel, and it does have a plasticiser and some additives — but honestly the 5000 is a great mix and will work just as well (as you are not needing to trowel since you are using the reverse cast method.) I would make sure to vibrate it really well to minimize air pockets. I’d probably go with the 5000 if I was you. It’s cheaper and does a great job.

                    • Clint Fleming

                      Hi Pete,

                      I can’t seem to find anyone in my City that stocks Quikrete 5000. They do stock Quikrete 6000. Do you know if this would work as well ? Sorry if this is a dumb questions, I just don’t know enough about the differences.
                      Thanks
                      Clint

                    • Clint Fleming

                      Or has anyone tried the basic Quickrete concrete mix in the yellow bag. It’s rated at a 4000 psi strength. If anyone has any feed back on any of these mixes , I would be interested in hearing from you.

                    • diypete

                      Hi Clint, I’ve used the yellow bags for a few walkway / sidewalk pours. It doesn’t have some of the additional additives as a few of the mixes (curing time is a bit slower and final PSI is 4000 vs 5000 as is), but it is cement, sand, and gravel which are the building blocks of all mixes. I’ve made my own mixes before from scratch and would do it in much the same way as the mixture in those bags. With proper re-enforcement, water ratio, vibrating, and proper cure time I’d feel comfortable using that mix. I like to add a little portland cement to the mix

    • Jess

      Final pictures & measurements

      • diypete

        Absolutely gorgeous. I love it!

    • DIYPETE

      Hey Jess! Just wanted to say your project turned out amazing! I love it:) Keep up the great work and thanks so much for sharing the photos! ps: that base color looks great as well. — and I wish I would have had my latest video up for you when you were making it, but here is one that shows the process (somewhat similar I’m guessing to what you did)! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9A_DWfbLzs – What video did you find on the topic? I’d like to check that one out too!

      • Jess

        So cool! I absolutely love the outdoor coffee table you made in the video- we’ll have to tackle that next. I actually didn’t follow a video for the stain treatment on the legs (and this was the first time I’ve stained wood). I used Minwax classic gray and then layered Minwax white pickling stain over it. We knew we wanted a lighter gray color overall to offset the dark charcoal color of the concrete tabletop. It took a few test runs on a scrap piece of wood, but turned out great!

        • DIYPETE

          I think your experimenting with the gray and pickling stains turned out awesome. You rocked it with that project!!!!

  • bernyk

    I Just finished my base and had a few friends (5) come help put the top on today and it looks fantastic! while i downloaded the plans for the base i ended up going my own way but your how-to for the concrete top has been super helpful.

    all i have left is a bit of portland cement and sealer!

    • Hey! Nice work on the concrete top and the base. They both look great! Best of luck with the finishing touches. You’ll have to post a photo once its completely finished too, would be cool to see. Congrats on a job well done! – Pete

      • bernyk

        next step…. chairs haha

  • Mallory Gnaegy

    Hi Pete! I had a lot of fun building this project and was very pleased with how it turned out (see attached pic!) However, I applied a cement and tile sealer and it’s tacky to the touch, which is exactly what I don’t want for a dining room table. Do you you have any advice for me? I followed the sealer’s directions and it even cautioned about not over applying because of tackiness (which I tried not to do). SOS.

    • Mallory Gnaegy

      The pic didn’t attach properly – here’s the final!

      • Hey Mallory! This looks absolutely fantastic! Also, let me know when you get the sealer thing figured out! — I’ve never used the Thompsons — but I do know from experience that the Cheng sealer works really well and you won’t ever have any tacky issues. Cheers!

      • Nirav

        Hey Mallory, Can you post more pictures of your tables from different angles, I like your leg arrangement.

  • Tripp

    Hi Pete,

    New to your site and excited to have found it. Regarding concrete. Do you ever consider the use of GFRC in a project like this to reduce size, weight and keep it strong? Will that even work?

    • DIYPETE

      Hey, thanks for reaching out! You know, I haven’t really considered that, no. I’ll have to look into that some more though, appreciate it!

  • Salena Lewis

    Hi Pete,
    My husband and I are trying to save to purchase our first home. So we cannot spend the money on these high end tables that we love. Not right now anyway. 🙂 We need a new dining room table and absolutely love the look of this one you have as your example. Including the chairs. I’m considering (with my dad’s help 🙂 ) making one for us. You make it look so easy. What type of wood and color stain is that for the base and chairs? Wish this chick some luck! I’m gonna need it! lol

    • DIYPETE

      Salena, you’ve got this! Thanks for reaching out to us here. Congrats on your first home, this would be an amazing housewarming gift to yourselves. The wood can be purchased very affordably, simply using pine 4x4s and the stain on my particular setup is Minwax espresso stain. One quart (http://amzn.to/1HkvJoD) should be plenty of stain. Again, good luck and show us some finished photos. Cheers!

      • Salena Lewis

        Thanks buddy!! 🙂 I will absolutely post pics! Be waiting for questions. I might have some along the way. 🙂
        Happy Thanksgiving!

        • DIYPETE

          Absolutely! 🙂 We’ll be here for you, Salena! Happy Thanksgiving to you and your loved ones too!

  • Adam G

    Can this plan be modified for a smaller table? We don’t need it as long or wide in our kitchen.

    • Hi Adam! You can easily modify the base and the concrete top to be a smaller size. Simply modify the Free plans to shrink the base to the size that best fits your kitchen. The same can be done for the mold for the concrete top. If you have any other questions just holler. Cheers – Pete

  • Looks great! Does the concrete top just “sit” on the base? Any issues with leaning on the top and having it move, wobble, etc.?

    • Hey Richard thanks for reaching out! We secured blocks underneath the tabletop for added support, it will be shown in the video. No issues with movement at all, no. Video will be up shortly and I’ll let you know then!

      • Good to hear thanks!

        • DIYPETE

          Richard, I’ll attach photos to this comment here that help show the concrete top mounting process. Also, the video is now live (embedded above)! Check it out. Cheers